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The 

CHESTNUT BURR 

THE YEAR BOOK 

1924 VO L. XI 



KENT STATE COLLEGE 
KENT, OHIO 



Compiled and published for the Class of 1924 by: 
Chester E. Satterfield ) _, „ 

V EDITORS-IN-CHIEF 

Elmer P. Steigner j 

Miriam B. Lister Business Manager 



Jforetoorb 

We send this book aiming you, realizing that it 
probably contains mistakes. But we have done our 
best — therefore, we offer no apologies. We have not 
endeavored to produce a work distinguished for its 
artistic merit ; our purpose has been to prepare for you 
a compilation of pictures and records which shall be of 
some definite service to you in years to come. 

The late beginning of the fall term, the discon- 
tinuance of Assembly during the process of redecorating 
the auditorium, and the apathy of many in the matter 
j{ furnishing us with their photographs, have been 
obstacles difficult to surmount. The first two were, ot 
course, unavoidable; the last was entirely unnecessary. 
To those who, either actively or passively, have hindered 
us in our work, and who have made our task far more 
arduous than it should have been, we extend complete 
forgiveness. To those who have helped us by their co- 
operation and words of encouragement, we are grateful 
to a degree inexpressible in words. 

We are glad to have served you. We have tried to 
serve you well. If. at some future time, beneath the 
evening lamp, by some quiet fireside, these pages bring 
to you memories of those friends and events from which 
Time has .separated you — such is Time's way! — our 
labors shall have been fully justified. 



7'h ret 



*+* >TNWT-ewaa 



tKable of Contents 



Page 

Campus 11 

Faculty 17 

Senior Degree Class 37 

Senior Diploma Class 45 

Degree Undergraduates 69 

Juniors 83 

Organizations 97 

Fraternities 113 

Athletics 117 

Happenings 129 

Chestnut Burr Staff 136 

Jokes and Advertisements 13<> 



Four 



CH4b6TNWT-6Waa 



VLo & Greater Hent &tate 

toe betricate all tfcat map be of toort!) 

in ttiis bolumc 





W. A. Cluff 



D. L. Rockwell 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Sherwood D. Shankland Willoughby 

David Ladd Rockwell Ravenna 

David C. Wills Cleveland 

William A. Cluff Kent 

William M. Courses East Youngstown 




D. C. Wills 

OFFICERS OF THE BOARD 

David C. Wills President 

William A. Cluff • Secretary 

David Ladd Rockwell '.-. , .Treasurer 





W. M. Coursen 



S. D. Shankland 



Six 




President John Edward McGilvrey 



Y . n 



-A& 



NWT-ewaa 




Eight 



3n Jfflemoriam 

William i§>tetoart &ent 

g Jknefactor to 
Eent #l>tate Ceacfjcrfi College 

^tg splenbib gift for tlje founbation of ttje 
College is a fitting; monument to a life beboteb to 
unselfish sierbice. 






Xine 



3n Remembrance of 

Clara H. ^ttcfccocfe 

?£eab of ttje Hinbergarten department of tbis College 
1914=1923 

S brabe anb gentle labp, a goob comrabcatrue frienb, 
a btnb anb generous belper, a toise anb earnest teacfter, 
tbe influence of tohose toorfe anb personality toill long 
remain in tbis institution toberein sbe is so greatlp 
misseb. 






Ten 




Eleven 




Twelve 




Thirteen 




l ! o uric en 




Fifteen 






FCFS. 




Sixteen 




_s 



Seventeen 




LESTER S. IVINS 
Department of Agriculture 




H. D. BYRNE 

Department of History 




ELEANOR ANN MEYER 
Associate in History 



Eighteen 






BLANCHE AVALINE YERDER 

Dean of Women 




ISABELLE C. BOURNE 

Head Resident, Moulton Hall 




LOIS TREFETHEN 

Dietitian 




Nineteen 




RAYMOND E. MANCHESTER 
Department, of Mathematics 




HAZEL HEWITT 
Associate in English 




Twenty 



DAVID OLSON 

Department of Geography 






EDGAR PACKARD 

Department of English 




CHARLES FREDERICK KOEHLER 

Principal High School Departvient 




CHRISTIAN FERDINAND Rl'MOLD 

Department of Chemistry and Physics 




Twenty-one 




HENRI BOULET 

Department of French 




CLINTON S. VAN DEUSEN 
Department of Manual Training 




GEORGE A DAMANN 
Associate in Manual Training 



1 U'cnty-two 



24 



:- A 



MARGARET DUNBAR 

Department of Library Science 




MABEL THURSTON 

Assistant Librarian 




ALEX WHITE 

Custodian 



74. 




^^-^ 






■ — ' 



I 



*> 



y-±>^ 



Twenty-three 




BERTHA LOUISE NIXSON 
Department of Household Arts 




RUTH ELLEN WEST 

Associate in Home Economics 




ORA BELLE BACHMAN 

Associate in Public School Music 



Twenty-four 



NINA S. HUMPHREY 
Department of Public School Art 












N 



A 



RENA M. POTTORF 

Associate in Public School Art 




ANNE MAUDE SHAMEL 

Department of Public School Music 







Twenty-five 




MARIE E. HYDE 

Department of Physical Education 




FRANK N. HARSH 
Director of Athletics 




AIITTIE SMITH 

Resident Nurse 



Twenty-six 



STEPHEN AMBROSE HARBOURT 

Extension Professor 




LAWRENCE VV. MILLER 

Associate in Education 
Department of Home Study 




PAUL G. CHANDLER 

Department of Education 




Twenty-seven 




ADA HYATT, ,..,, 

naif ■••'/! M; 
Training Supervisor Primary^ Grades 



y% „--"" 




BESS DUNSTAN RIDER 

Training Supervisor Intermediate Grades 




AMY IRENE. HERRIFF, 

Training Supervisor Senior High School 



Twenty-eight 






EDITH M. OLSON 

Principal and Training Supervisor 
Junior High School 




EMMET C. STOPHER 

Superintendent of Training School 




MAY H. PRENTICE 

Director of Training 







T;i;-ntx->\int- 




HERTA HEBERLEIN 

Training Supervisor Kindergarten 
Department 




MARGARET JEFFERY 

Training Supervisor Primary Grades 




IDA C. JACOBSON 
Training Supervisor Primary Grades 



Thirty 



ISABELLE HAZEN 

Training Supervisor Senior High School 




MAUD L. VAN ANTWERP 

Training Supervisor Intermediate Grades 




• NORA O'ROURKE 

Training Supervisor Junior High School 




z 



1% 



./--S^. 



Thirty-one 





FERN BOOTH 

Office 




WILLIAM VAN HORN 
Office 




MABEL LAIRD 

Office 



Thirty-two 



HELEN FLYNN BONSALL 
Office 




ADALINE KING 

Office 




ISABELLE DUNBAR 
Associate Librarian 




Thirty-three 



MIRTIE MABEE 

Training Supervisor Junior High School 

ELSIE MABEE 
Training Supervisor Intermediate Grades 

ETHEL GOWANS 
Department of Biology 

D. W. PEARCE 

Extension Department 

HELEN BUKER COOPER 

Assistant in Biology 



®fje Jfacultp 

Too often we have failed to voice our appreciation of the work of those 
patient men and women who are devoting their lives to our training. We 
gladly avail ourselves of the small opportunity afforded in these pages to 
express our gratitude for their services. 



Thirty-jour -^=SS£^**k5Xl- 




Thirty-five 




entor degree 

Class of 1924 



^y 



m 



Thirty-seven 




NAOMI HYLAND 
Class Secretary 



Cleveland 



PAUL COLLINS PACKARD 
President College Section 



IDA FLORENCE CRITZ 



PAUL S. SPANGLER 



Kent 



Wadsworth 



Wooster 



Thirty-eight 



HELEN M. DUER 
Class Treasurer 



North Jackson 




E. PAUL STEIGNER 

President Senior Degree Class 
Editor "Chestnut Burr" 



ADA HYATT 



C. E. SATTERFIELD 

"Chestnut Burr" Editor 



Kent 



Killbuck 



Kent 






Thirty-nine 




MARGUERITE McQUAIDE COFFIN Massillon 




A. SANDERSON 



Mineral Ridge 




MARY SECOR 



-East Cleveland 




A. W. SCHWARTZ 



Euclid 



Forty 



LAURA XL RIEDINGER 



Kent 



ELBERT TISCHENDORF Lincoln City, Ind. 



HARRIET WIXGERD Middlebranch 



WARD II. OVERHOLT 



Kent 




£*#&' 



Forty-one 



ALBERT VVAITE 



H. WALTER 



Forty-two 




Kent 



JAMES V. HARWOOD 



GORDON' M. DeWITT 



Kent 



Cleveland 



Middlefield 



ADRIAL COOK 
RUTH G. ALSPAUGH 
G. F. CREAMER 



Akron 

Cuyahoga Falls 

Lorain 



LUCILLE GRACE SKILTON SMITH Ravenna 

HELEN BUKER COOPER Kent 

C. F. HEDGER Kenmore 

L. X. JOHNSTON Freeport 

ANNA CAROL WILLIAMS Youngstown 

H. L. BATES Caldwell 

MARY A. KENT Cincinnati 



Forty-three 



Eent State's Jfour gear Course 

LESTER S. IVINS, 
Chairman Four Year Course Committee. 

It is a matter of great importance to the friends of Kent State to learn that one ot 
last year's graduates, Lauramarie VVegmau, who secured her B.S. in Education, has 
just been granted her admission card to the graduate school of the University ot 
Chicago. This admission is granted without any condition in the way of an ex- 
amination, work to be made up, or a probationary period. Her splendid record at Kent 
State was appreciated by the University ot Chicago officials. Her admission to the 
graduate school of Chicago is a deserved recognition. It also places Kent State in a 
splendid position among the colleges of the country that are now granting the B.S. 
Degree in Education. 

The graduates of the four year course are making a success in the high schools. 
Many are occupying good positions as school superintendents, principals of elementary 
schools, principals of high schools, as well as teachers of high school subjects. 

The demand for high school teachers in Ohio is greater than the supply. This 
state is required annually to secure hundreds of high school teachers from other states. 
The demand is still increasing because junior high school principals are now requir- 
ing teachers of the 7th, 8th, and 9th grades to have degrees. It is only a question of 
time until junior high schools will be classified by the State Department of Education 
the same as senior high schools are at the present time. 

When one studies the list of graduates of the two year course at Kent State, he is 
impressed with the large number of excellent teachers who should be working on the 
third and fourth year of the college course, if these graduates who now have 96 term 
hours or 24 credits, would secure a total of 192 term hours they could receive the B.S. 
Degree in Education. This would mean 96 term hours of work in addition to what they 
already have, which can be taken in any quarter of the school year. In other words, all 
the work a two year graduate already has recorded, will count on the four year course. 

Many of Kent State's two year graduates are now working on the four year course. 
During the summer of 1922, 46 were so registered. During the summer of 1923, 276 
were working on the degree. These figures indicate the tendency. A much larger 
number will take degree work during the summer of 1924 than in 1923. 

Between one-fourth and one-third of the present enrollments at Kent State are in 
the four year course. Almost the entire freshman class who entered the college depart- 
ment October 1, 1923, are planning to take four years of straight college work. A small 
percentage of these will have their programs so arranged each term that it will be 
possible, if they find it necessary, for them to secure sufficient normal work the first 
two years to obtain the normal diploma and begin teaching at that time. The final 
plan of those in the four year course who take the diploma in two years will be to return 
later for the third and fourth year of the degree course. 

A degree student must have a major containing at least 36 term hours in one depart- 
ment and a minor of 24 term hours in another department. If the major is in the 
department of Education, then the student must take two minors. 

The required Education which was taken to secure the Elementary Certificate is 
counted in making up the requirement for the high school certificate. 

The degree student in addition to completing the major and minor requirement, 
and the educational work for the high school certificate, must also secure 12 term hours 
in the Social Science Group, 12 term hours in the English Group, 12 term hours in the 
Science Group and 12 term hours in the Industrial and Fine Arts Group. After com- 
pleting all these requirements a student still has opportunity to take additional courses 
in any department he desires to make the total 192 term hours. 

The Senior class taking the four year course this year will be the largest in the 
school's history. 

Students desiring further information concerning the four year course should write 
to the college at once. If any person has an official transcript of credits from another 
college, it should be sent to us, after which we will inform the student what additional 
work is required for the B.S. Degree from Kent State. Credit slips should not be sent 
in any case as the college is required to have the official transcript signed by the Regis- 
trar to give an official rating. 



Forty-four 




entor JBtploma 

Class; of 1924 






^W<.. 



Forty-jivr 










RUTH MILDRED BEBOUT Mi. Vernon 

"Bee" 

"For she was just the quiet kind." 



MARGARET JOSEPHINE COLE Youngstown 

"Marg" 

"Modesty is her forte." 



EDNA MAE REINKE 
"Eddie" 

"Right brisk was she and full of spirit." 



Elyria 



HELEN ARDIS SPOONER Canton 

"Spooner" 

"True as the needle to the pole, or as the dial to 
the sun." 



MIRIAM B. LISTER Cleveland 

"Mini" 

"Nothing great was ever achieved without en- 
thusiasm." 
Business Manager of Annual. 



FRANCES GERALDINE RODGERS 

"Frannie" 

"As full of spirit as the month of May.' 



forty-six 



RUTH LILLIAN MORTIMER 
"Bob" 



Elyria 



"Never trouble yourself with trouble, till trouble 
troubles vou." 



RUTH GRACE HORNER 

"Dimples" 

"Her very frowns are fairer far 
Than smiles of other maidens are." 



HOMERVILLE 



PEARL IRENE PHILLIPS 

"Peg" 

"Labor is itself a pleasure." 



Geneva 



EDITH II. KELLEY 

"Kdlcy" 

"A true friend is forever a friend.' 



Salem 



MILDRED VERNE GEIGER East Palestine 

"Mint" 

"Clear honor shining like the dewy star of dawn." 



.WIS CATHERINE HALL East Palestine 

"Puritan" 

"Prosperity to the man who ventures most to 
please her." 







Forty-seven 





MAYE RALSTON Conneaut Lake 

"Maizie" 

''Nothing endures but personal qualities." 



EULALIA LEWIS 

"Lewie" 

"A man's a man for a' that." 



Massillon 







J. MERVIN SMUCKER Smithville 

"A good fellow in a quiet way." 



VIRGINIA HARRIET LYNN East Cleveland 

"Jinny" 

"I cannot check my girlish blush, 

My color comes and goes, 
I redden to my finger tips 
And sometimes to my nose." 



ELIZABETH B. LOHR 

"Lorry" 

"A veritable book-worm." 



DOROTHY IRENE HOFF 
"A heart so warm and true." 



New Milforp 



Medina 



Forty-eight 



GLADYS M. GREEN West Coxsackie, N. Y. 

"Greenie" 

"A woman's work is never done." 



GERTRUDE ALICE ALTLAND Massillon 

■Gertie" 

"Merrily she rolls along." 



EDITH JOHNSON Ashtabula 

"She's pretty to walk with and witty to talk with." 



ERMA IRENE MARINELL1 Younostown 

"Curly" 

"Fair tresses man's imperial race ensnare." 



MARIE A. ROLLER 
"Sis" 

"Silence is the one great art of conversation.' 



Columbians 



MARLEAH MARGARET COX 
"A heart so warm and true." 



Ashtabula 












Fartx-nine 




IRENE DOROTHY GUTENTAG Cleveland 

"Renee" 

"When a man's in the case, all other things give 
place." 



MABEL CATHERINE BERNS Canton 

"Bobby" 

"Credits, not men, have always been her aim." 
Rep. to Student Council. 



EDITH DELL CRISWELL Cuyahoga Falls 

"Ede" 

"Her voice was ever soft, gentle and low, 
An excellent thing in woman." 



a. fflj 




CARL GIFT 

"But in his duty prompt at every call." 



LUELLA P. STARK Elyria 

"Luly" 

"Serene, and still and calm and self-possessed." 



LORETTA M. McLAUGHLIN Cuyahoga Falls 

"Irish" 

"Take life too seriously and what is it worth?" 



Fifty 



ruth b. McDowell 

"Mickie" 



Shiloh 



"Good nature, times brains, divided by sincerity, 
equals Ruth." 

Rep. to Student Council. 

Secretarv-in-Chief Kcntonian. 



ELIZABETH EVELYN REED Ashtabula 

"Babe" 

"A remarkable feature is her smile." 



MILDRED E. MOORE 
"Millie" 



Nellie 



"She has a natural genius for combining business 
with pleasure." 



EMMA JESSIE SATTERLEE 

"Em" 

"Thy modesty's a cradle to thy merit." 

Sr. Class Treasurer. 



AXDOVEK 



BETTY M. RICHARDSON 



Columbian.' 



" Where is that perfect, honest student?' 
The grave professor said: 
Back came the sighing echo: 
Flirting, campused. or dead." 



BEATRICE PAULINE IIASS Marblehead 

"Bee" 

"Labor conquers all things." 



24- 









Fijty-ont 







ENID DICKISON Dennison 

"Bella Donna" 

"The truest friend is she. the kindest lass in doin.; 
courtesy." 



ELSIE TOWN Middlefield 

"An open-hearted maiden, true and pure." 



FLORENCE M. MAYES Medina 

"Flossie" 

"It is a friendly heart that has plenty of friends." 



IONA SHEPHERD Phalanx Station 

"And. but herself, admits no parallel." 



JOSEPHINE WINIFRED BROWN Warren 

"Joe" 

"Fairest and best adorned is she. 
Where clothing is humility." 



FERN ALICE HAMMEL 
"Industrious" 



Bolivar 



"Never idle a moment, but thrifty and thoughtful 
of others." 



Fifty-two 



GLADYS ADA NOBLE Painesville 

"Happy" 

"Our deeds determine us as much as we determine 
our deeds." 



MARY F. SCHONVIZNER 

"Shaney" 

'"A good scout." 



Cleveland 



AUDREY LOUISE WARREN Orwell 

"Jud" 

"Charms strike the heart, but merit wins the soul."' 

Treas.. Y. W. C. A. 



ADALINE BURNETT 
"Curly" 

"Mary Pickford's arts." 



Yoi'NCSTOWN 



MARY JOSEPHINE FRANK Loudenville 

"Frankie" 

"There is a certain wonderful sweetness and de- 
light in gaining knowledge." 



NORMA 1). WHIPPLE 
"Norm" 

"Short but sweet." 











Fifty-three 









KATHERINE C. WATSON Burton 

"Virtue's a stronger guard than brass." 



DOROTHY OPAL MERCER 
'"Mirth, admit me of thv crew.' : 



Phalanx 



MARGARET L. UMPLEBY 

"Peg" 

"One vast substantial smile." 



Strongsville 



CLARA KLINGENSMITH Warren 

"Courteous though coy. and gentle though retired." 



RUTH NAOMI PAPE 

"Her air. her manners, all who saw admired." 



MARGARET ELIZABETH BECHER Bolivar 

"Peggy" 

"Our youth we can have but today; 
We may always find time to grow old." 



Fifty-four 






GRACE M. BEAVER \[ T . Vernon 

"And still be doing, never done." 



HENRIETTA JUNE ADLER 

"Heny" 

"'Come and trip it as ye go 
On the light fantastic toe." 



ETHEL DOLBEAR 

-Esiudr 

"Not all bears are teddies. 1 



YoUNGSTOWN 



Lorain 



ESTHER GRACE KIEFFER 
"Mickey" 

"Modesty is the beauty of women." 



Kent 



RUTH CORALYNN HICKS Conneaui 

"Diligence is the mother of good fortune." 



TESS1E L. TOWN Middlefield 

"Always a sweet sunny smile." 







Fifty 








MILDRED M. TALBOTT E. Palestine 

''Good words are better than bad strokes." 



BEATRICE BERNICE STRATTON Suffield 

"Bee" 

'And all may do, what has by man been done." 



MARY MARGARET PHELAN Youngstown 

"Mary Marg" 

"It is good to lengthen to the last a sunny mood." 



FLORENCE DOWMAN ALEXANDER 
"Marriages are made in heaven." 



Bedford 



CORA KELLER 

"Don't look at me, or I'll run." 



Hartville 



MAZIE VICTORIA VICKERS 
"Mazie-m' — roomate." 



Coshocton 



"To love and be loved is the greatest happiness ot 
this existence." 



Fifty-six 



VERLA BINGHAM 
"Slim" 

"Good-natured, jolly, dependable." 



New Milford 



JANE GERTRUDE DONNELLY Youncstown 

"janie" 

"The glass of fashion and the mold of form." 



RUTH CROCKER Medina 

"Where you have friends you shall not go to inns." 



MILDRED E. SCHIRACK Canton 

"Mickey" 

"Whence that three-cornered smile of bliss?" 



FLORENCE KATHLEEN McCANN Struthers 

"McCann" 

"A flaming meteor shone for hair." 



1'ERESE LOUISE CLARK Kent 

"Celery" 

"Some books are to be tasted, other to be swallowed 
but all must be collated and catalogued." 









Fifty-seven 





JULIA GOODWIN 
"Judy" 

' There are smiles that make us happy." 



Fresno 



ETHEL MAY WOOLF 

"Skeezix" 

"The dependable sort." 



Alliance 





IRMA SERENA STEVENSON 
"Sunnie" 



Coshocton 



'Oh, boys, I love you all, and I cannot decide 
which I like best." 



NEVA MAE GERMAN 

"Jane" 

"There's one modest kind and" fair.' 



Delroy 



Huron 



ELSIE RUTH STOTTS 

''Jane" 

"Never said two words where one would suffice." 




EARNEST J. SHOXK 



Dundee 



"A person we can understand, he goes to school 
for what he can get out of it." 



Fifty-eight 






BLANCHE DOWNING 

"Rollie" 

"Every ounce of her is amiable." 



St. Clairsvm.i.i 



MARIE R. YOUNG 
"Pat" 



YoUNGSTOWN 



"Charms strike the heart, but merit wins the soul." 
Pres.. Y. W. C. A. 



VIOLET UPTON 
"Salty" 

"Work! Work! Work! My labor never ends." 



New London 



BLANCHE MATHER 



Warren 



"Fair is the damsel, passing fair; sunny at distance 
gleams her smile." 



MARY BARBARA ULMER New Washington 
"The best sport." 



BLOOMA ZIEGLER Medina 

"With countenance demure and modest grace." 



m 









<22^/ 



Fitty-nine 









CORINNE D. LEDGER 

"Crenee" 

"Better named, 'Lotta Pep.' " 



Youngstown 



CAROLYN HOPPER Youngstown 

"Toot 5" 

"Deep brown eyes running over with glee." 



ANN VVARTH Massillon 

"Jackie" 

"The quiet mind is richer than the crown." 



ALICE PALMER KELLOGG 

"Sweet Alice" 

"Honest labor bears a lovely face." 



Ashtabula 



JULIA ELIZABETH THOMPSON Sharon, Pa. 

"Jude" 

"Ha! Ha! Ha! That's a hot one." 



Sixty 



CARRIE STOAKES ANGUS 
"Sincere and studious." 






Toronto 



ELIZABETH BUCHER Cortland 

"Betty" 

"Happy am I; from care I am free! 
Why aren't they all contented like me?" 




BEATRICE BROWN 
•'Bee" 



New London 



"Her modest looks the cottage might adorn. 
Sweet as the primrose peeps beneath the thorn.' 



LEWIE N. BROWN 

"Lou" 

"None knew thee but to love thee, 
Nor named thee but to praise." 



New Londo.% 



MARJORIE ESTELLE ANDREWS Norwalk 

"Marge" 

"A pleasing countenance is no slight advantage." 



JEANETTE ROEMAINE CLARK 



E. L 



IVERPOOI. 



"A still sma 



LAURA MAY E\ ANS Brecksville 

"Plough deep while sluggards sleep." 








Sixtv-one 






WILLA MAE MARKLEY Conotton, Pa. 

"Snitz" 

"Who mixed reason with pleasure and wisdom with 
mirth." 



MARGARET E. HIRSCHMAN Uniontown 

"Silence is more eloquent than words." 



ELEANOR LEUTY 

"She is prim and very neat.' 



Pai 



NESVILLt 






DOROTHY EVANGELINE COMPTON 

"Dot" \. KlNGSVILI.f. 

"Beauty is truth, truth beauty." 



FLOSSIE FLORENCE ARMSTRONG 

"Flo" Cortland 

"So quiet we scarcely knew she was here." 



ELOISE CHAMBERLAIN 
"Spuds" 

"I would rather be than seem to be." 



SALt^ 



Sixty-two 



MAUDE TAYLOR GIBSON 

"Slim" 

'"We couldn't do without her." 



Kent 



RUTH EVA SNYDER Windham 

"Some touch of nature's genial glow." 





DOROTHY MARIE FANS 

"Dot" 

"A tender smile our sorrow's only balm 



Cleveland 



MARNETTE SULLIVAN 

"Marny" 

"Silence in woman is like speech in man." 



DORIS MILDRED HANCE Columbia Sta. 

'There is a society in the deepest solitude." 



MILDRED CLARE McCULLOCH N. Fairfield 

■■1/./," 

"Smile awhile, and while vou smile another smiles.' 







Sixty-three 




PEARL STAATS METCALF 

"Nor are her charms for everyone 
But mostly for one soul alone." 



Youngstown 








ILA MAE DAUGHERTY Chagrin Falls 

"Shorty" 

"No trifling idle fancies here hold sway, 
Her work receives attention first, then play." 



OSCAR WALDO VANCE Cambiudce 

"Van" 

"On their own merits modest men are dumb." 



COL' 



KATHRYN E. ROLLER 
"Kay" 

"In the mildest manner and the. gentlest heart 



UMBIANA 



DELLIS LUCILE ORKIN 
"Dell" 



Geneva 



"The most certain sign of wisdom is continual 
cheerfulness." 



GLADYS VERA OPPER Newton Falls 

"Glad" 

"If you want learning you must work for it." 



Sixty-jour 



MARIE V. QUINN 

"Oumnie" 



YOUNGSTOWN 



"You have waked me too soon. I mush slumber 
again.' 



ESTHER M. McIXTYRE 
"Action is eloquence." 



Andovek 



DAISY C. LENGEL 
"Born for success she seemed 
With grace to win, with heart to hold.' 



Canton 






HAZEL AXX McCRACKEX Youngstown 

"Pepper" 

"All famous people have at some time had red 
hair — for example — 



BELLAII KEMP PACKARD Cuyahoga Falls 
"Biddy" 

"Her face betokened all things dear and good." 



MARIE [MELDA GREEN Kent 

"Mariezy" 

'"Noble deeds chat are concealed are must es- 
teemed." 






Start v 




MARY JOSEPHINE K.ELLEY Struther* 

"KeUey" 

' Exceedingly fair was she." 



MARGARET LE BEAU Can-ton 

"Peggy" 

"The noblest mind the best contentment has." 



K.ATHRYN LOUISE OODDS 

"Doddy" 

"She's all my fancy painted her.' 



Suffield 



L1LLIAS G. EVANS Wilkensburch 

-i sir 

Her \\;ns are ways of pleasantness, and all her 
paths are peace." 



Sixty-six 




MRS. ELNO ACKWORTH 
LGUETTA BACHTEL 
NELLIE BOYD 
HILDA BRANCH 
MRS. EDITH BUTRICK 
CECELIA ELLERIN 
EDITH ESCHLIMAN 
MARY FARRELL 
ROSETTA FLOOD 
HELENA FORTUNE 
ETHEL GALEHOUSE 
VIDA CARMAN 
EDNA GE'.SINGER 
MIRIAM GOLD 
SON I \ GOLD 
EUNICE GRUBB 
ANNA HAMILTON 
HANNAH HARRISON 
MRS. MILDRED HOEFFLER 
DOROTHY HUNSICKER 



RUTH HUNTER 

BESSIE JENNINGS 
INEZ KRUEGER 
HARRIET LOVELAND 
NINA LOWER 
MARGARET McNALLV 
ROSA MIKOLAJEZKY 
MARGUERITE MOORE 
MARY O'CONNOR 
FLORENCE OZERSKY 
RUTH RAQUET 
MRS. MARGARET RHODES 
MYRA SANDERSON 
BERTHA SCHAEFFER 
FLORENCE SPRINGER 
GRACE ST.MIL 
MRS. HELEN STOPHER 
HELEN STOSKOPF 
MABEL YOAK 
EMMA YOST 






Sixty-fevtn 




Sixty-eight 






degree 
Unbergrabuatess 



24 

•~"~/ Si\ty-illii<- 



GERALD HOWARD CHAPMAN 

FRANCES M. TWEEDY 

LUCIEN C. BLACK 

LUCILLE N. RIEDINGER 
LAURA MAE RICHARDSON 

EVERLIX BLISS D1LLE 

RAY PALMER SMITH 

THELMA R. PROEHL 
MARJORIE HELEX SHATTUCK 

RUTH ZAUGG 

ELMER E. KNERR 

ISABELLA COLLINS. 
FRED ZAPPOLO 

JESSIE MAE PRESTON 

MINELLA STADLER 

LEON H. SABIN 



Seventy 








'---z^z^s '^^_ ; 



Seventy-ont 



LAURA DEMING 

WILLIAM GIFFORD BEANE 

CHARLES RAYMOND GARDNER 

THELMA BEATRICE HYLAND 

WINIFRED ELIZABETH STONE 

EMILY ELAINE SKILTON 

GERTRUDE ROBINS 

MARION ALFRED WOLCOTT 

CLARENCE LE ROY COOK 

LILLIAN ALBERTA CUMMINS 

LUCILLE ELIZABETH SHERMAN 

MARION L. CORBETT 

GLADYS ADELLA SPONSELLER 

FRANK C. CORP 

VVILBERT E. MATHIAS 

NELLIE MARIE BRUNGARD 



Seventy-two 





hi f-thret 



BENJAMIN G. SCHROEDER 

GERTRUDE ANNA HUFFMAN 

CLARICE I.ODF.L BEAMER 

HOWARD DANNER EVANS 

CHARLOTTE ELIZABETH JONES 

RALPH CLARK ROGERS 

JAMES REED BECK 

DONNA LOUISE LEFFINGWELL 

PASQUAL A. CARLOZZI* 

MARY ELLEN CONROY 

ARDIS ELIZABETH BURROUGHS 

GLENN DAVID FRANCIS 

FRANCES ROMAINE CHAFFEE 

E. FRANKLIN TROTTER 

DELTON C. SMITH 

GLENNA MOORE STINE 




Seventy-four 




#5 



Sevent 



NEVA EUGENIA WILLIAMS 

HAZEL MAY BELL 



NAOME BURKE 



DOROTHY BERNICJi HARPER 

MARIE ESPENSCHIED 



GLADYS ELIZABETH STEM 

NINA ELLEN CHAPMAN 

ALICE DIXON 



HELEN JANET BLAKE 

RUTH VERNA PROEHL 

MARY HOPTON 



LUCILE IRENE BELL 



MARGARET 0. HUGHES 

FRANCES M. THOMPSON 

MARY JEANNETTE O'DEA 

IDA MARIE RICZINGER 




Seventy -six 







z4 



Sevent - 



GEORGE HOMER KRIEG 

ESTHER LEON A MERRELL 

LOUISE VELNETT FENTON 

HAROLD CHARLES HULME 

MARION VIOLET KING 

EUGENE WILLIAM BARRY 

BURDETTE B. WEAVER 

FLORENCE ELENE LE PREVOST 

HELEN FLORENCE DAVISON 

CARL J. MARTI 

WILLIAM D. SHOEMAKER 

LEONA ELEANORE WHEELER 



EUGENE J. FEELEY 



AGNES IRENE WATSON 

MILDRED HENRIETTA JOHNSTON 
CONRAD B. LANDIS 



















i£&L*wLJu*» 


Ehh 






^^^■Bg^WMfcaafc^gg ^^^^-^iBS^i,,^-- ■ '. -3» 


JUJf -' V-- -f^'ufe 


■ 


. 


■ 


■ 


A 


■ ; ' 


vdsMHHHHI 



Seventy-eight 




Seventy-niiu 



GLADYS B. REICHARD 

JEANNETTE HAMILTON 

HULDA V. SCHRECENGOST 

RICHARD LEE DAVIS 

RUTH MAE RYLAND 

KATHRYN ALENA KINGSLEY 

ALMA GERTRUDE HOSKIN 

LAWRENCE C. WAGONER 



JEAN A. HAMILL 



KATHRYN MARIE IRWIN 

ROBERTA MARIE JOHNSON 

KATHERINE MAY FRASE 



JOHN HENRY ZIEGLER 

ALICE A. HICKMAN 



DORIS TETLOW 



MILDRED ALBERTA JONES 




Eighty 










sm_- 


^H 


■fir 


■ 


.-1 




|v* 




J* 





7.4. 



Eighty-one 



KATHRYN BIETZ 
GEORGE DAMANN 
HARVEY GIFFORD 
LEONA McGRATH 
MRS. FRANK MOZENA 
FRIDA WERNECKE 
FRANCES BOETTLER 
HAROLD BROWN 
CHARLES CHACEY 
FLORENCE DANNER 
KATHERINE DIETERICH 
GEORGE ELLIOTT 
EDYTHE FLOYD 
GILES GUTHRIE 
HELEN HAHN 
OLLIE HISEY 
HOWARD JENNINGS 
ARLEEN OWEN 
JOHN SCHIELY 
IVAN STATLER 
FLORENCE BABB 
CHARLES BEAUBIEN 
ELLIS BETZER 
AUGUST BROWN 
HERMAN CHAPMAN 
ALFRED COUCH 
MARJORIE CURTIS 
DOROTHY DICKEY 



WILLIAM DORRANCE 
MARY DREW 
MILDRED ELGIN 
MABEL ENGLER 
KATHLEEN FISHER 
CLARENCE GERREN 
HOWARD KEENER 
NAOMI KING 
PAUL LEVERING 
JANET MacLELLAN 
MRS. EVELYN McBRIDE 
HELEN MALONEY 
NANCY MORELAND 
ALMA NIEHOFF 
GLADYS OHL 
AUGUST PETERKA 
JOHN PORTER 
HILDA RHODES 
ELIZABETH ROHLY 
HARRY TARR 
VIOLET THEISS 
EVERELLA WILLIAMS 
MRS. OLIVE FRANCE 
MARGARET JEFFREY 
EARL McPEEK 
MRS. ISABELLA MATLEY 
JOHN H. SWARTZ 
CHESTER SWANK 



Eighty-two 



-■'V 

~W5 ' 




u 



Eighty-three 



HELEN THOMPSON 



MERREL DRESSER CRISS 

HELEN MYRTLE BECK 

VIRGIL PERRY 

MARY MARGARET KALEY 

MARGARET RAY 

KATHERINE LENNON 

VIRGINIA LYDA ULMAN 

MURIEL BERNICE CRALL 

GISELLA ANNA HUDOK 

FLORENCE ELEANOR BAISLER 

RUTH ANNA WINTER 

MARY BULINIA WAID 

MARGARET H. MATERNA 

ALICE THOMPSON 

CATHERINE ALTHEA WOODWARD 




Eighty-four 




z4- 



Eight 



MABLE ANN ETTA GEE 

GRACE IRENE GAUGLER 

MYRLEE HOLT COTTLE 

CATHERINE RACHEL FRICK 

EVA BOLTON 

VERNA HEFFELMAN 

DOROTHY EVANS 

RUTH MAE RICHARDS 

MARY DOLORES DeBlNCO 

EMILY HELEN LUDLOW 

RUTH BOETTLER 

MABEL MARGUERETTA WALKER 

FLORENCE EVA WISE 

FRANCES JANETTE MICHALEC 

MABEL GERTRUDE FOOTE 

MARGARET SMITH 




Eighth-six 




s+1 



24 



Eighty-seven 



BERNICE ELIZABETH FISHER 

BERMETEA FOLTZ 

LITTA MARIE MITCHELL 

IMOGENE CANFIELD 
RUTH OAKLEY GIBSON 

KATHRYN CAMILLA THOMPSON 

LUINEA STONE 

AGNES BLANCHE LAUTZANHEISER 
ALICE ELEANOR CHAMBERS 

WILLA MAY MARKLEY 

LUCILLE GLADYS BRAY 

HARRIET WRIGHT SMYTHE 
ALTHA M. LOVE 

RUTH MARKLEY 

RUTH EDNA COCHRAN 

HELEN M. STEVENS 




Eighty-eight 




Hi 



.y 



Eighty-nine 



r-ewRi 



BASIL CHENEVEY 

BERNICE WEBB 

MABEL IRENE FAWCETT 

MALVIN M. TROYER 
WILLA BESS YEAGER 

MARY BERNICE KUHN 

FRANCES EVELYN SPARR 

AGNES HARRIETT TILTON 

ADRIENNE ELFORD 

MABEL L. UNGER 

PAULINE MAY WASSEM 

FAYE SCHMID 

MILDRED WINGER 

GRACE AGNES WERNER 

MARY MARGARET GIBSON 

LONA MARIE MILLER 



Ninety 








Z4- 



Ninety-one 



NEDRA GERALDINE SMITH 

NAOMI EDNA HANNA 

IRMA MARY EGAN 

PEARL CORDELIA DUNNING 

FRANK WALBURN 

NANCY ELIZABETH SKELDON 

BLANCHE ELIZA GABLE 

PAUL G. NEWMEYER 
CORA ISABEL BUCHNER 

EDITH PAULINE WILLIAMS 

ALICE ELIZABETH SWIXEHART 

RUTH C. RARICK 
GLADYS C. FEIGERT 

THELMA E1LEEX COLLINS 

FLORENCE GIXTHER 

ROZELLA YODER 





mi 


| 


' ! '<* 




p^gsil^lB 


F 'i 


|imT|fTOT'}!]ilH.I!I! 


RfTlT-llf^it. 


■ * 




S- ; 



Ninety-two 




qygj 



Ninety-three 



LUCILLE GEORGE . 

MAUDE MIRIAM RIEMENSCHNEIDER 
FLORENCE LTQUORI 

MILDRED LILLIAN KIRCHBERG 

LELIA MARIE LITMAN 

MILDRED ALENE COVELL 

LENORE ANNA WATSON 

MILDRED ALBERTS SCHLUP 

MARY MARGUERITE YERIAN 
RUTH RAY 

GRACE SMUCKER 

VIVIAN AMELIA JOHNS 

CARRIE E. MILLER 

WILMA ALBERTA CARTER 

MARIE LENGE 

KATHERINE MARGARET SCHULLER 



Ninety-four 




©TNWT-eWRR 




TA 



Ninet 



GLADYS ALBER 
LORAN ALEXANDER 
MRS. DORIS ATVVOOD 
DORA AZOFF 
ELSIE BACHMAN 
NAOMI BAKER 
DOROTHY BALDWIN 
CLARA BAUGHMAN 
EDNA BEAL 

HORTENSE BEARDSLEY 
OLIVE BEDFORD 
RUTH BOYD 
ABBIE BRAGG 
GLADYS BRENNAMAN 
RUTH BYERS 
BERNEITA CLINGER 
ETHEL CODER 
ALICE CONRAD 
ANNA CORNELL 
WILMA CRAMER 
RUTH CUSACK 
MARY DIXON 
RUTH DOUGLAS 
HELEN DREW 
HAZEL DUSTMAN 
RUTH ENGLANDER 
MRS. ANNA FAULKNER 
MARIAN FORSYTHE 
FLORA FOX 
MARGARET GAMBER 
NETTIE GARRETT 
GRACE GERKE 
KATHERYN GILBERT 
LILLIAN GOLLAND 
BEATRICE PALMER 



ANGELINA GRANT 
ANITA GRAY 
L1LLIE GRETG 
GENEVIEVE HALL 
RUTH HALLOCK 
VIVIAN HELM 
SARA HENRICLE 
CHARLENE HERMAN 
MARION HILL 
BERNICE HIXENBAUGH 
LU VERNE HOAG 
MINNIE HUSTED 
JESSIE JACK 
FLORA JACOBS 
HELEN KEIDEL 
CECILE KINGSBURY 
THEODORA KLOHA 
ELIZABETH KRAL 
GERTRUDE KREISELMAN' 
MRS. JESSIE LACKEY 
MRS. RUTH LEFFINGWELL 
BLANCHE LIBIS 
EMILY LOGAN 
KATHERINE MacCARTHY 
CATHERINE McNALLY 
MARY MASTERS 
LOVA MENGES 
FANNY MESHOT 
VIOLA MILES 
MARGARET MILLER 
MARIE MILLER 
PEARL MILLER 
ROSE MILLER 
RUTH MORCOMB 
ANNE MYLOTT 



MARILLA PARKER 
THERESA PARKER 
RUTH PIEREN 
ALICE PITMAN- 
FLORENCE QUINN 
LILLIAN RAKI 
GLADYS RICE 
MARGERY RICHARDSON 
MARGARET ROBERTS 
CHRISTINE ROBERTSON 
OPAL ROBINETTE 
HENRIETTA ROBISON 
NIETA SCHMIDT 
CATHERINE SCHULLER 
FRANCES SCOTT 
ELIZABETH SEIBEL 
WALTER SHAMAIO 
ALICE SHANAFELT 
IVA SHOOK 

ELIZABETH SOFCHALK 
MABEL SPEIDEL 
MRS. EVA SPENCER 
ETHEL THOMPSON 
CATHERINE VARTORELLA 
MAE VINCENT 
LUTHER WALLS 
FRANCES WHEALE 
EDNA WILHELM 
LARIETA WILLIAMS 
FLORENCE WILMOT 
ELDEN YOUNGEN 
ESTHER REICHARDT 
ESTRELLA GROVE 
ROSE OCKER 
LINA OSBORN 



Ninetx-six 









. 







Ninety-seven 










OvERHOLT 

Berks 



Evans 
Verder 



schroeder 
McDowell 



Manchester 
Green 



Hent g>tate Council 

Kent State Council was established in February, 1924. It is the first 
organization of its kind in our college, as its membership is drawn from both 
the student body and the faculty. The Council meets twice a month to con- 
sider ways of co-ordinating and guiding the activities of the student body, 
and to initiate new forms of activity on the campus. On March twentieth, 
the Council was presented by Dr. McGilvrey to the college, at a regular 
assembly. Each member of the Council spoke on some one phase of work 
to be undertaken. The new organization ought to prove of great value 
in promoting a "Greater Kent State." 



Ninety-eight 






NWT-6WRR 







Tweedie Deming 

Andrews 



K. Thompson Daugherty Warren 

Hahn Gibson Woodard 



tEfje Somen's! league 



This is the one college society to which every woman in Kent State 
belongs. 

The League arranges for one all-college dance each term, and for a 
tea dance after each registration during the college year. The tea dances 
are in connection with the Big Sister organization, which the League has 
in charge, and has this year reorganized. The League gives the reception 
and dance in honor of the college guests at Home Coming. 

Besides the social events, the League puts on a definite number ot 
assembly programs during the year,' one of them being the Arbor Day pro- 
gram, with the planting of a tree by the League on the campus. It also 
holds itself responsible for certain parts of the Campus Night program. 

The League has only one policy — the greatest service possible to all 
the women ot the college, and the building up of a stronger college spirit. 



Ninety-nine 




H 


^S 


*>*w» : 


■^^■s^ 


1" ;:.' 


_____^__ 



0;u' Hundred 












TNWT-eWRa 



Etc Mtris Union of &ent £>tate 

Organization has come to he the keynote of the twentieth century. 
Political candidates intrench themselves behind the bulwarks of organiza- 
tion — Parties. Business men have augmented their powers for the accumula- 
tion of the world's goods by the most intensive, as well as extensive organiza- 
tions — companies and corporations. Last, but not least, student leaders have 
become aware of the infinite possibilities for the advancement of Kent State 
athletics and a greater college spirit, which are inherent in a co-ordination 
of functioning units. Truly this suffices to show that the handing together 
of Kent State men, who are willing to give themselves to great tasks which 
are facing our school today, is in accord with the trend of the times. Every 
man who enrolls in the college automatically becomes a member of the 
Men's Union. Although it is not bound together by any written constitution 
or other document, this group is held together by a singleness of purpose, 
which finds expression in its slogan: "A Better and Greater Kent State 
College." 

OFFICERS 

Everlin Uille President 

Conrad Landis Vice President 

Lucicn Black Secretary and Treasurer 



COMMITTEE 
Frank Corp, Chairman 



Elbert Youngen 
fames R, Beck 



Raymond Gardner 
Paul Spangler 



One II inul ml One 




One Hundred Two 



fcSTNWT-eVg/RR 

"Etje kentonian" 

Kent State's College paper, "The Kentonian," like everything else at 
Kent State, had a small beginning, but in passing through the years ot 
progress appears today a paper of which we are quite proud. In its early 
years it was a four-page weekly published by the English 12 classes and 
printed in the College printing room. On stated occasions only did it assume 
a larger size. 

As the years passed, the paper ceased to be a four-page weekly and 
became a twenty-four page booklet, published about every six weeks. These 
publications are of such immensity that the work no longer is done in the 
College printing room, but is taken care of by outside publishing houses. 

In 1922-1923 each number had a characteristic cover design appropriate 
for each of the several occasions, but in the present year a plain standard 
cover has been adopted. 

The expense of publishing '"The Kentonian" is met partly by its sub- 
scription price and partly by the student activity fund. The subscription 
price, however, has been greatly reduced since the earliest publications o. 
the paper. Originally a subscription cost $1.50 per year. Today one may 
receive the entire year's publication for 50c. 

In its early days the paper circulated only among the students of the 
College. Today it is sent far and wide to members of our Alumni. Approxi- 
mately two thousand copies of "The Greater Kent State" number were dis- 
tributed. 

This resume gives one the historical background of our College paper 
which is now a regular publication of our institution. It is contributed to by 
bur entire student body, arranged by the present members of th^. staff, and 
printed by the Schueneman Printing Company of Akron, Ohio. 

The Kentonian Staff 

Editor-in-Cliief E. Xaomi Hyland Manager James R. Beck 

Secretary to the Chief Ruth McDowell Assistant Manager Conrad B. Landis 

Associate Editors 

College Department Ben Schroeder Training School Gwendolyn Drew- 
Diploma Class Beatrice Stratton Athletics Marion Wolcott 

Juniors Adrienne Elford Social Elizabeth Bucher 

Alumni Isabella Collins 

Faculty Committee 

Edgar Packard, H. D. Byrne, Ada Hyatt. 

Ctje Hent College Press 

The Kent College Press is a publication that speeds up by subtle sarcasm 
and naive witticisms the slow and stagnant inertia of dying ambitions moving 
sluggishly in the college student. 

The college press is a medium whereby the necessary facts in regard to 
modern life are delicately filtered through the brains of all classes — the 
ignorant and illiterate along with the heady and the wise. 

Being a forerunner of a college of Journalism its greatness and im- 
portance can not be overestimated. It is the medium through which the 
student mav express himself in a free and easy manner that springs from 
the heart. 

\t is distinctly a student publication and its most valid claim for recogni- 
tion is the "Red Flame." 



" Ilumlrstl Thrfe 










Hahn Skeldon Buchner McDowell Johnson Richardson Marineli.i 
Owen Chamberlain Young Warren Andrews 



i. W. C. 3. 



The Y. W. C. A. of Kent State is the onl) r religious organization on the 
campus. The efforts of the chapter are directed along the three lines of 
devotion, education, and social service. 

It is under the auspices of the Y. W. C. A. that the Christmas Carol 
singing has been conducted for the last two years. 

Much interest has been shown in working for the Caney Creek Com- 
munity Center, at Pippapass, Kentucky. Several boxes were sent there for 
Christmas. 

Kent State sent several representatives to the "Y" Conference at Lake 
Erie College, Painsville, Ohio, in April, 1923. Miss Marie Young and Miss 
Eloise Chamberlain were sent to the Y. W. C. A. Sectional Conference at 
Eaglesmere, Pennsylvania, in June, 1923. Miss Laura Richardson and Miss 
Nina Chapman attended the "W" Conference at Wooster College, March, 
1924. 

Of special interest to all members is the "Candle Light Service" in March, 
when the officers for the new year are installed. 



One Hundred Four 










©fenestra 

The Orchestra is the crowning feature of the new instrumental depart- 
ment which has been added to the college this year. It is under the direction 
of Chas. F. Corlett, of Dana's Institute. This organization has appeared in 
Assembly twice this year creditably, and has also furnished the music for 
the Annual Board Play, "Green Stockings," and the High School Senior Class 
Play, "Daddy-Long-Legs." In ensemble with the organ and four hands 
at the piano, the Orchestra will play the lirst movement of Schubert's Un- 
finished Symphony at Commencement. 

The membership of the Orchestra includes not only college students, but 
also students of the Junior and Senior High Schools. 

Personnel: — Gwendolyn Drew, Jean Gorham, Verna Proehl, Mildred Elgin, Loretta 
McLaughlin, Maxine Moore, Olive Bumphrey, Doris Harwell, Emil Slopak, Elizabeth 
Rufener, Harry Karr, Ellis Betzer, Lowell Van Deusen, Eloise Chamberlain, Thelma 
Proehl, ('. !•". Corlett. Director. 



One Hundred Five 






NWT- 




LOWRY HALL 




MOULTON HALL 



One Hundred Six 






i i I -■ 



i LI I 



\ mK9!i ^^. 




OFF-CAMPUS GIRLS 

0uv Womtn i£>tubentg 

The women students of Kent State are diversified and unified in their 
several organizations. Each woman is a member of one of the lesser groups, 
according to where she lives during her college course. If she lives in one 
of the dormitories, then she is a member of the Lowry group or the Moulton 
group. If she lives at home, or rooms in a private family in Kent, then she 
is a member of the Off Campus group. Each one of these groups is thoroughly 
organized, and arranges for a certain definite number of activities, chieflv 
social. Naturally the women students make most of their friendships within 
the lesser groups to which they may belong. 

There are. however, abundant opportunities for all the women students 
to meet those outside these smaller groups. In their class rooms, on the 
athletic teams, in the Y. W. C. A., in the college assemblies, and at the all 
college parties, women meet and know those who do not live in their own 
residence groups. Furthermore, there is an organization of all the women 
of the college — the Women's League. Every woman automatically becomes 
a member of this society when she registers in the college. It is through 
this League that the Big Sister organization is being developed in Kent 
State. 

A few intimate friends, well chosen, are. indeed, a priceless boon in 
any young woman's life; but a wide acquaintance with many young women 
is in itself most educative. ( Ipportunities for enriching one's life in both 
these ways are open to the women students of Kent Stale. 



One Hundred Seven 



TNWT-6VRR 







SciIULLER 




Forsy 


[HE 


Stevens 


Smith 


Winter 




Schmidt 


Reiciiard 



Special &rt i§>tubent£ 



The special art class may be small, but nevertheless we are an important 
group. 

Where do the various committees go for posters, or for advice on decora- 
tions? The art classes are always ready to do their bit in making dances and 
entertainments successful through their advertising abilities. 

We have our good times together. Our visits to the art museums are 
always enjoyable. Our visit to the Cleveland art museum proved doubly 
entertaining through the generous efforts of Mr. Howard of the Cleveland 
School of Education. He was a very interesting guide; the pictures took 
on new meaning through his interpretation. 

Our picnics are happy affairs. The lunches are especially tasty when 
packed in the baskets which we have made and decorated with our own 
hands. 



One Hundred Eight 






CH 







J^ome economics 

The department of Home Economics of Kent State is truly living up to 
its standard in the economizing of material, time, and talent. People are at 
last realizing the value of a course in this department. Besides the Special 
students training in the subject; fully two-thirds of the graduates of the 
other departments have elected courses in Hume Economics during the 
past year. 

A guest at one of the luncheons given by the .n'irls of the department 
finds the girls not only capable of serving a well-planned meal, hut also well 
versed in the art of receiving and entertaining. The clothing exhibit and 
reception at Homecoming showed the results achieved in the work of the 
department. 

One afternoon in April, the girls of the Home Economics Department, 
under the direction of .Miss Xixson. gave a combination bridge-party and 
dance. The proceeds of the affair were handed over to the Chestnut Burr- 
without any solicitation whatever on the part of the staff. 

Such deeds as this spring from that spirit of co-operation and unselfish- 
ness for which Kent State'is striving. The Chestnut Burr gladly tenders the 
Home Economics Department this slight recognition. 



One llmii/rr-d Nine 




Special Jflusic H>tut>ent£ 

The Music Department was fortunate in having an exceptionally large 
and strong class of special students this year. The classes are growing and 
each year shows a decided increase in both numbers and quality. 

The work in piano and voice has been unusually good and the students 
of the group have made the music of the Assembly programs both pleasing 
and entertaining. 

The combined classes have sung at Assembly and have furnished music 
for the Baccalaureate program and for the Music programs of the Music- 
Department. 

Voice and piano recitals in class have been interesting features of the 
class work. 

Seniors: — Mary Helen Squires, Rosetta O'Connor, Ruth Hunter, Katlierine Chan- 
man, Thelma Proehl, Sonia Gold. 

Juniors: — Xaomi Baker, Mar.iorie Curtiss, Helen Davison, Alice Dixon, Mildred 
Elgin, Beatrice Gamber, Gertrude Kreisehnan, Corinne Ledger, Elene Le Prevost, 
Loretta McLaughlin, Mrs. Tsabelle Matley. Mrs. Frank Mozena, Mrs. Verna Proehl, 
Hulda Schrecengost, Helen Shatluck, Leona Wheeler, Irene Wilhelm, Larieta Williams. 



One Hundred Ten 







(green Stockings 



"Green Stockings," given April fourth under the auspices of the annual 
board, is a clever English comedy. The heroine, tired of being patronized, 
invents a lover for herself. But, so strange are the workings of Fate, the very 
man whom Celia thinks she has invented, actually exists. When the play 
reaches the point at which Celia declares that her lover has been killed, the 
real man appears. Of course, the ending is a happy one — Celia marries her 
"Hobbles." 

THE CAST: 

Celia Helen Keidel 

Col. Smith — Celia's lover August Brown 

Mr. Faraday — Celia's father \lex Whyte 

Mrs. Christopher Farady (Aunt Ida) Neva Williams 

Phylis Marie Leuge 

Madge (Mrs. Rockingham) Kctty Richardson 

Evelyn (Lady Trenchard ) Hazel McCracken 

Robert Tarver — Phylis' fiance John Porter 

Admiral Grice i 

rT ... , y C arence Wagoner 

Henry Steele I 

Jimmy Raleigh - J ohn Swartz 

Martin Howard Jennings 



Director Edith Ke 1 1 cy 

Manager Miriam R. Lister 



One llunJri-tl Eleven 



department of Extension 

By Lester S. Ivins, Director 

The Extension Department of Kent State College was organized very 
soon after the establishment of the college. The regular instructors began 
teaching college subjects in the field before the buildings were completed on 
the campus. This plan very quickly built up a large and efficient Department 
of Extension. Few colleges in the country have given teachers in service 
better opportunities to gain professional credit than has Kent State. 

Superintendents of Schools attribute a large part of the professional 
spirit of teachers who teach in Northeastern Ohio to the extension work which 
has been provided by the institution at Kent. These Superintendents point 
out the fact that summer school work alone is not sufficient. They say teach- 
ers do better when pursuing a regular course of study while teaching. 

This last winter the Department of Extension established a Bureau of 
Lecture Service. Many of the regular faculty members have consented to 
accept speaking engagements in Kent territory. The Department is prepared 
to mail to any interested person a list of the names of the faculty members 
and the subjects upon which they are willing to speak. 

The purpose of Kent State from the beginning, has been to offer every 
possible opportunity for educational advancement to teachers in the field. 
If a group applies for an extension center during the late summer quarter 
or very early in September, the institution makes an effort to send an in- 
structor to this center. If a sufficient number cannot be secured, those in- 
terested are informed they can secure work through the Home Study Depart- 
ment. 

The regular instructors who are full time extension men are at present 
Prof. S. A. Harbourt and Prof. D. W. Pearce. Both of these men are very 
competent instructors and capable of giving high class work to persons 
interested in extension. We suggest that persons who are interested in ex- 
tension work to secure credits for the diploma or for the degree during the 
coming school year call at the office at Kent State, or write the college or 
the Director for full information. 



One Hundred Twelve ^~—^Z^^^Z/''Z<P'^>\^' 




One llumtrnl Thirteen 









^appa Jltt Happa 

Founded at Kent State College in 1922 

Alpha Chapter 

(Established in 1922) 

OFFICERS 

Arthur Schwartz Graduate President 

Fred Zappolo President 

Benjamin Schroeder .' Vice President 

Raymond Gardner Secretary 

Elbert Teschendorf Treasurer 

Pasqual Carlozzi Master of Works 

Everlin Dille Prelate 

John Schicly S. at A. 

Honorary Member 
Alexander Whyte 

Board of Governors 
Lucien Black, Benjamin Schroeder, Howard Evans 

Class of 1924 
Arthur Schwartz, Cleveland, O.; Elbert Teschendorf, Lincoln City, Ind. 

Class of 1925 

Fred Zappolo, Macedonia, O.; Howard Evans, Canal Fulton, O.; Everlin Dille, 
Cleveland, O.; Pasqual Carlozzi, Cleveland, O.; Lucien Black, Pulaski, Pa. 

Class of 1926 
John Swartz, Canton, O.; John Schiely, Cleveland, O.; Benjamin Schroeder, South 
Euclid, O.; Ralph Rogers, Kent, O.; Marion Wolcott, Kent. O.; Glen Francis, Martins- 
burg, O.; Raymond Gardner, Millersburg, O.; Howard Jennings, Ravenna, O. 

Class of 1927 
Eugene Feely, Rye, N. Y. 



One Hundred Fourteen 







m 

President Paul S. Spangler 

Vice President Elmer P. Steigner 

Secretary James R. Beck 

Treasurer Gerald H. Chapman 

Cliaplain „ Elden H. Youngen 

Board of Governors 
Lawrence Wagoner, Conrad l'>. Landis, Leon H. Sabin 

Honorary Member 
Professor C. I". Rumold 

CHARTER MEMBERS 
Class of 1924 
Elmer P. Steigner. Kent, ().; Paul S. Spangler, Wooster, Ohio. 

Class of 1925 
James R. Beck, Fredericktown, O.; Gerald II. Chapman, Kent, <>.; Leon II. Sabin, 
Randolph, O.; Elmer Knerr, Sugar Creek, <>.: Elden II. Youngen, Regersville, <). 

Class of 1926 
Chark> Chacey, Stow, O.; Laurence Wagoner, Ravenna, <>.; Conrad B. Landis, 

liutlcr. O. 

Class of 1927 
Eugene Barry, Rootstown, O.; Herman Chapman, Kent. ().: Clarence Gerren, 
Rootstown, ' ). 

-7<L • -— 

•*-j*/^ ^i-*- ">"' Hundred Fijtctn 



Hent &tate anb tEtje Alumni 

Do you realize that the alumni of an institution are its most important 
factor ? 

You and 1 come here day after day and we see each other, and see our 
instructors, but, unless we are here at Home Coming time, we see but few 
of the alumni. Thus it is only natural that we should get the idea that the 
alumni of our college are almost an unknown quantity. 

Just because we do not see them, however, does not prove that there is 
no such body. 

Let me prove to you that there is a great body of Kent State College 
alumni, and that it is a most influential factor. Since this college was 
established in 1913, it has graduated 1,623 students. These are the alumni 
proper of our college — the real graduates of Kent State. Besides these there 
is that multitude of students, totaling almost 20,003', who have been enrolled 
here at some time or other but have not yet completed their courses. These 
are also sometimes called the alumni. 

Nearly all these people are at work in the field of education, — those who 
have graduated and those who still look forward to that honor. They are 
showing to the state of Ohio, and to other states of the Union, what Kent 
State College really is. The public judges an institution by its representatives. 
Kent State stands or falls, lives or dies, by the type of teacher it sends out. 
These teachers gain new ideas through experience and are able to criticize the 
methods and policies of this college and to offer suggestions for its improve- 
ment. 

In the past the alumni of our college have not been as active as the alumni 
of some other colleges, especially of private and religious institutions. This 
may be due to the fact that our alumni members have not been called upon 
for financial support, or it may be because they have felt that they had no 
agency within the college, through which they could operate. We want 
them to feel that here is a medium through which their wishes and sugges- 
tions may be made known. 

Soon you, too, will be alumni. We want you to feel that here is always 
a council and that through it you may be in close touch with the college. 
Come back often and feel free to write to the council at any time. For here 
is a long needed organization in which faculty, alumni and student body will 
find a medium through which their wishes may materialize. 

This council can become great only in so far as it is used. We firmly 
believe it has within its powers and possibilities the making: of that some- 
thins - to which we all look forward with eagerness — A GREATER KENT 
STATE. 

By MABEL C. BERNS. 

Rep. of Kent State Council, 
Kent State College. 



One Hundred Sixteen 



thlctics 




.2* 



Our llmulrrd Seventeen 




Harsh Stopher Van Deusen 

TESCHENDORF SpONSELLER MANCHESTER GlBSON SpANGLER 



gtfjlettc Poarb 

The Athletic Board of Kent State is a student-faculty board organized 
and maintained to govern athletic activities of both men and women students. 
Action of the Board is subject at all times to the approval of the President. 
With the growing strength of our teams, the introduction of the intra-mural 
program of sports, the opening up of the four-year Physical Training Course, 
and the completion of the new gymnasium, the work of this Board will be- 
come more and more important. The officers for the year are : 

Chairman R. E. Manchester 

Vice Chairman Marie Hyde 

Secretary Gladys Sponseller 



One Hundred Eighteen 




"IT ifflen 

First Row: — Everlin B. Dille, Paul S. Spangler, Lawrence C. Wagoner, 
Eugene J. Feelev, James R. Heck, .Marion A. Wolcott. 

Second Row: — Glenn D. Francis, Elden II. Youngen, John II. Swartz, 

Eugene Barry, Howard Jennings, Howard Evans. 

Third Row: — E. Paul Steigner, Benjamin Schroeder, Herman Chapman. 
Ralph Rogers, August Peterka, Pasqua] A. Carlozzi. 



Or,:- Hundred Nineteen 




One Hundred Twenty 



baseball 

First Row: — Brand, Sheetz, Hofree (Captain), Ritter, Barrett. Wizard. 
Second Row: — E- Evans, Hostetler, Toot, Huge, H. Evans. Gibson. 
Standing: — Steigner (Manager ). 
Paul Chandler, Coach. 

Baseball has long been a major sport at Kent State. It is the one game 
which seems to have a general appeal to the student body and it is in this 
sport that the Blue and Gold has written the most cherished pages of its 
athletic history. 

While the season of 1923 was not a complete success in respect to games 
won and lost, the squad was the largest in history and competition for posi- 
tions on the first nine was very keen. 

Early season practice was hampered somewhat by the improvements 
made on Rockwell Field, but the team finally struck its stride and closed the 
schedule with a very creditable showing. 

Coach Paul G. Chandler directed the play of the team mi the diamond 
while Elmer P. Steigner attended to the managerial duties. 



One Ilitm/ret/ Twenty 




One Hundred Twenty-two 



Jfootball 

Victory is not essential to success! Hannibal, une of history's greatest 
military leaders, never achieved victory, but his heroic efforts earned him an 
enviable place in the Hall of Success. 

This is by way of introducing the 1923 football season at Kent State, 
the record of which shows no victories, but a season which may well be con- 
sidered the most successful in school history. 

There are many reasons why Kent State was not victorious on the grid- 
iron during the past year. The squad was small and without experience. 
The starting of school one month later than usual prevented the all-important 
conditioning period. The team that was coached to start the season was 
early riddled by injuries and withdrawals. Light and inexperienced, the Blue 
and Gold was forced to meet on the gridiron some of the most formidable 
elevens in the Ohio Conference. 

Please don't misinterpret: this is not written as a defense — the 1923 Kent 
State football team needs no defense. 

Whatever may have been Coach Harsh's contributions in his first year 
at the helm of Kent State football, there is no gainsaying that the greatest 
was "FIGHT." Bruised, battered and beaten, Kent State's gallant warriors 
of the moleskin never relinquished that "FIGHT'' and they were battling 
in the last minute of the last game with a spirit that augurs nothing but 
victory in the future. 

The Silver Foxes of 1923 gave to their school its first touchdown, but 
they also gave something infinitely more than that. They created a fighting 
spirit that will live — an undying determination that will make the football 
record at Kent State in the future a thing of joy. 

All hail the season of 1923 which witnessed the birth of an unconquerable 
spirit! Honor the players of 1923 and enshrine them in memory's treasure- 
house ! 

KENT STATE 
WINNING 

RATHER THAN LOSING 
BUT 

WINNING OR LOSING 

KENT STATE 



One Hundred Twenty-three 



& fa ^ t*> 








One Hundred Twenty-four 



Girls' Pagfeettmll 



First Row: 

Mabel Gee 
Eva Bolton 
Lona Miller 

Second Row: 

Ruth Ray 
Dorothy Evans 
Xettie Garrett 
Grace Gougier 
Mabel Walker 

Third Row: 

Vivian Johns 
Cora Buchner 
Theresa Parker 
Alice Conrad 
Esther Libis 
Mary Wade 



First Row: 

Inna Marinelli 
Dorothy Compton 
Nina Lower 
Ethel Dolbear 

Second Row: 

Mildred Shirack 
Eloise Chamberlain 
Elizabeth Reed 

Mary Yerian 



First Row: 

Nancy Skeldon 
Neva Williams 
[da Riczinger 

Second Row: 

Gladys Sponseller 
Nita Schmidt 
Helen Blake 



First Row: 

Ruth Winter 
Helen Ludlow 
Helen Beck 

Edna Beal 

Second Row: 

Xedra Smith 
Anne Myloth 
Mildred Covell 



One Hundred Twenty-five 




First Row: Jennings, Evans, Francis, Feeley, Schroeder. 

Second Row: Coach Harsh, Rogers, H. Chapman, Peterka, Spangler. 



basketball 



Giving the best in the Ohio conference a tough run for every victory: 
defeating our ancient enemy, West Virginia ; seizing for Kent State the 
championship of the City of Kent — these accomplishments of the basketball 
team mark the success of the Harsh regime. 

When the clarion call to conquest was sent forth last fall by coach 
Harsh, fifteen basketballers answered — three letter-men and a dozen other 
aspirants. Using the three letter-men as a nucleus, the coach built up a 
strong, lithe basketball squad of ten. Howard Evans joined the forces late 
in the season, increasing the number of letter-men to four, and incidentally 
strengthening the team by an additional forward. Early in the season, the 
"K" men on the squad selected Glenn Francis captain for 1924. 

In previous seasons most of the games were played out of town, but this 
year the majority of them were played on the home floor. The usual line- 
up was: Evans, Rogers or Peterka in the forward positions, Peterka or 
Rogers, center, with Schroeder and Feely as guards, — replacements were 
made with Jennings, Brown and Youngen. 

All games on the regular schedule — for the most part with Ohio Con- 
ference teams — were well played. The high-lights of the season were the 
defeat of our old rival, West Virginia, and the annexation of the City Cham- 



One Hundred Twenty-six 



pionship. In the games for the championship, our boys defeated the PerfeC' 
tion Dairies. 35 to 23, Davey Institute 34 to 14 and again 13 to 9. 

None of this year's team will he graduated in June. This fact un- 
doubtedly will make the Kent State five doubly strong next year. 



&f)e jgext g>tep 



Now and then someone expresses regret that Kent is not like some other 
college or university in this, that or some other particular. One will say, 
for example. "Look at such a college!" or "Why can't we be like Rah Rah 
University?" or "Where are our traditions?" 

Just to please such individuals suppose we do "look." Pick that fine old 
university at Miami for example. We do find a finished college. — but do not 
forget that Miami is 130 years old, more or less, while Kent is in the earl} 
'teens, just a kid among colleges. Look in other directions, if you like, and 
you will find colleges with more traditions, better plants, more organization 
in Athletics, etc. ; but again remember that fourteen years ago what is now 
Kent State College was a wooded hillside where woodchucks sunned them- 
selves on pleasant days and cattle grazed without interruption. 

Remember that Kent has grown from a mere idea to one of the greatest 
of the teachers colleges in these few years. 

With 1924 a new epoch in the glorious history of our college is to start. 
A new gymnasium, second to none in Ohio, will be ready for use and a new 
course — four years in Physical Training and Health Education leading to a 
degree — will be offered. A special faculty will be employed for this course 
and eventually a group of several hundred students will be enrolled. 

If these things do not stir your imagination it is very likely you are not 
blessed with such a thing and. if this be the case, it perhaps would be well for 
you to follow the trail of Rip Van Winkle and sleep twenty years. When 
you come back and look at Kent State you will find one of the great schools 
of the Nation; but. instead of saying with pride "My Kent State." you will 
be counted among those spectators who lacked faith. 



On? llumlrrtl Twenty-seven 



3ntramural gttjleticg 

Believing that athletics for the many is far superior to athletics for the 
few, Kent State, during the past year, has carried out an extensive intra- 
mural program. 

Under the supervision of Frank N. Harsh, new director of Physical Edu- 
cation for Men, the following schedule of sports has been used: Autumn- 
football, speedball, cross-country, indoor baseball and basketball ; Winter — 
basketball, foul shooting, indoor track and volley ball ; Spring — recreation 
ball, baseball, horse-shoe pitching, tennis and outdoor track. 

Other sports such as bowling, boxing and wrestling were included in 
the original program, but had to be eliminated because of inadequate gym- 
nasium facilities and the lack of funds to cover the cost of instruction. 

In order to intensify interest in this work, Director Harsh provided friend- 
ly rivalry by dividing the men of the school into two groups — Renters and 
Staters. Pascjual Carlozzi was elected to lead the Renters while Paul Spang- 
ler was chosen to captain the Staters. 

The Renters were victorious in speedball but the Staters won the tug- 
of-war contest and also finished first in football and indoor baseball. Honors 
were divided in the cross country run. 

Despite the handicaps incident to organization and the insufficiency of 
gymnasium space, the Department of Physical Education for Men has made 
a remarkable record during its first year. 

During the past year more than eighty-five per cent of the men students 
enrolled in school have taken part in some kind of athletic sports. With a 
new gymnasium the future development of this important phase of college 
activities is aglow with promise. 



One Hundred Twenty-eight 






Jr\ 



HAPPENINGS 

EAR 



4fr 



One Hundred Twenty-nine 




THE COLONIAL PARTY 



One Hundred Thirty 



October 



December 



>octal Calendar 



1 — Registration of former students. 

2 — Registration of new students. 

2 — Informal Get-Together Party, Moulton Hall. 

3— Y. W. C. A. First Meeting. 

4 — Getting acquainted and finding new friends. 

5 — Miss Verder's party for Girls — Moulton Hall. 

8 — Organization of Moulton Hall Girls. 

9 — "Oh! these teachers!" 

11 — Mr. Bott's demonstration of correct dancing. 
"We all dance like fairies now." 

12 — Another informal part3' for girls only.- 
"Where are the men of Kent State?" 

15 — Lowry Hall Girls organize. 

19 — Campus fire in honor of football men. 

"Will the men be clean shaven after the big game? We hope so." 

20 — Game, Banquet at Hotel Franklin, Dance including Orchestra and Men. 

23 — Birthday party at Lowry Hall. 

24 — More work and less sleep. 

25 — Faculty Women's Club celebrate birthday by a dinner. 



November 



8 — Faculty Women's Club have Tea at Science Hall. 
12 — Off Campus Women's Club Election. 

14 — Off Campus Women have afternoon party at Moulton Hall. 
15 — Same old story — study, study, study. 
16 — "Get your tickets for the party tomorrow eve." 
17 — Women's League Party — Did we dance? Oh! no. 
23— Lowry Hall Card Party. 



6 — Birthday Party at Lowry Hall. 

7 — Concert, Miss Eleanor Patterson. 

High School and College Annual Banquet. 

8 — Off Campus Girls give party. 

11 — "Pop Entertainment." Great success. 

Given by < )IT Campus Women's Club. 



One lluiuhiul Thirty-one 



January 



February 



March 



12 — Tea given to Kent Landladies by Miss Verder. 

13 — Bazaar. 

14 — Junior Class Play at Moulton. 

15 — Christmas Party — Moulton Hall. 

19 — Harpist at College Auditorium. 

20 — Trying to be good so Santa will visit us while at home. 



3 — Tea, Faculty Women's Club — Science Hall. 

4 — Women's League New Year's Party. "Did you see the old year get 
when the new arrived? Well it did." 

10 — College game with John Marshall Law School. 

11 — Lowry Hall Party — Moulton Hall. 

11 — High School game with Kenmore at Kent. 

12 — Mr. Byrne "Evolution," Social Science Convention. 

12 — College game with Defiance College. 

17 — Dinner, Faculty Women's Club — Moulton Hall. 

19 — Senior Class Play — Moulton Hall. 

25 — Junior Class Play. 

26 — College game with Cedarville College at Kent. 



1 — Northeastern Ohio Parent Teachers' Association Meeting 

7 — College game with Wilmington College. 

8 — Senior Annual Banquet. 

13 — College game with West Virginia State Normal School 
16 — Colonial Party. 
22 — Holiday — Thanks to George. 
25 — Bridge Tea, Annual Benefit. 



1 — Senior Normal Class Party. 

3 — Women's League Meeting. 

4— O. C. W. Election. 

6 — Faculty Women's Tea — Science Hall. 

7 — Junior Class Gingham Party. 
12— Y. W. C. A. Election of Officers. 
14 — End of Term. 
20 — Student Council take part in Assembly. 



One Hundred Thirty-two 



April 



May 



June 



20 — Dinner — Faculty Women's Club — Moulton Hall. 
20 — Off Campus Women's Benefit — Opera House. 
22 — College Section Party — Moulton Hall. 
25 — Welsh Choir — Auditorium. 
28— Lowry Hall Party. 



1 — Fourth Birthday Dinner — College Dining Hal 
4 — College Annual Benefit — Auditorium. 
5 — Senior Class Play. 

25 — Home Coming Play by H. S. Seniors. 

26 — Home Coming Athletic Events. 



6 — Musical — H. S. Miss Shamel — Auditorium. 

8 — Training School Play. 

9 — Off Campus Women's Club Play. 
10 — Moulton Hall Party 
14 — Kindergarten May Party. 
16 — Junior Class Play. 
21 — Musical by Music Department. 
29 — H. S. Junior Reception for Seniors — Moulton Hall. 



1 — Baccalaureate. 

4 — Junior Reception to the Seniors. 

5 — College Commencement. 

6 — High School Commencement. 



One Hundred Thirty-three 



^tgt) £igf)t£iof 1924 



VALENTINE PARTY 

The Off Campus Club gave a Valentine Party February ninth in the 
Music Room in Moulton Hall. The unique feature of the party was the 
grand march which occurred in the middle of the dance. It was led by two 
Valentines. The reception line consisted of Miss Verder, Mr. and Mrs. 
Stopher, Mr. and Mrs. Manchester and Miss Neva Williams. 

COLONIAL PARTY 

The most picturesque party of the year was the annual Colonial Party 
given by the Y. W. C- A. on February sixteenth. Colonial furniture was 
placed around the Music Room and there were lavender and yellow decora- 
tions. During intermission eight girls in colonial costume danced the minuet. 
A grand march, in which those who were in costume participated, followed. 
The prize for the best costume was given to Miss Naomi Hyland. Prof, and 
Mrs. Ivins came garbed as George and Martha Washington. Mrs. Bourne, 
Miss Meyer and Miss Verder were also in costume, and with Miss Marie 
Young and Miss Marjorie Andrews, made up a charming receiving line. 

BRIDGE TEA 

Since some people were tired of always having parties at night, the 
Annual Board decided to have a little different kind of party. They gave a 
"Bridge Tea" in the Music Room at Moulton Hall from three to five 
February twenty-fifth. Financially it was not so wonderful, but those who 
came had a lovely time and voted that we have more such parties. 

GINGHAM PARTY 

On March seventh the Juniors entertained us at a Gingham Party. All 
girls came gowned in gingham or light frocks, escorted by gentlemen wear- 
ing blue shirts and bow ties. Dancing and cards furnished entertainment. 
Mr. and Mrs. Miller and Miss Verder were patron and patronesses. 



'One Hundred Thirty-lour 



LOWRY SPRING FROLIQUE 

It was too bad that everyone could not attend the Spring Frolique the 
Lowry Hall (iirls gave. They surely know how to stage a peppy affair. The 
party was given Friday, the twenty-eighth of March. A part of Miss Ger- 
trude Kreiselman's ( Irchestra from Akron furnished superb music for dancing. 
Guests of the Hall were Miss Smith, and Mr. and Mrs. Byrne. Miss Yerdei 
and Miss Trefethen were patronesses. 

MOULTON HALL PARTY 

It was a pleasing sight that greeted those who attended the second 
Moulton Hall Party given March 8. The spirit of St. Patrick's Day was 
prevalent. Mrs. Bourne, Miss Smith and Miss Harriet Wingerd formed the 
receiving line. Seventy couples danced to snappy music. Games were pro- 
vided for those who did not dance. The frivolity was interrupted to form a 
grand march. Confetti and serpentine were given to all and the room was 
transformed into an entangled mass. The dancing continued until eleven 
i /clock. 

COLLEGE SECTION STAGES REAL PARTY 

Amid a setting of ferns, the student body of Kent State danced to the 
bewitching strains of LeMeyer's ( hxhestra. The program of the evening was 
delightfully varied. .Miss Ruth Hunter sang two selections and Josephine 
Woodward gave two solo dances of unusual appeal. The receiving line was 
composed of Mr. and Mrs. Ivins, Mr. and Mrs. Stopher, and Carlan Elliott. 



Ont lliinilrril Thirty-live 







One Hundred Thirty-six 



Cfjestnut $urr g>taff 



Inserts: 



Chester E Satterfield I Editors-in-Chief 

timer r. Steigner \ 

Miriam I',. Lister Business Manager 

First Row: 

Marie Lenge J oke Editor 

Virginia Lynn Society Editor 

Betty M. Richardson I Women's Athletics Editors 

Hazel McCracken ) 

Second Row: 

Neva E. Williams Snapshot Editor 

Edith H. Kelley Photograph Editor 

Marie Espenschied Calendar Editor 

Additional: 

Carlan Elliott Assistant Business Manager 

Paul Spangler -\rt Editor 

Paul C. Packard ! Men ' s Athletics Editors 

Marion A. Wolcott ) 

R. E. Manchester Faculty Adviser 

Chestnut purr Constitution 

ARTICLE I. 

Election of Editor-in-Chief and Business Manager. 

Section 1: — The presidents of the Junior Degree Class and Junior Normal Class 
shall, not later than the second week of the Mid-Spring Term, appoint three members 
from their respective classes to act as a Chestnut Burr Committee. 

Section 2: — It shall lie the duty of the Chestnut Burr Committee, with the assistance 
of the faculty adviser and the Editor-in-Chief and Business Manager of the existing 
Chestnut Burr staff, to .elect the new Editor-in-Chief and Business Manager. 

Section 3: — The Editor-in-Chief and the Business Manager must be selected from 
the Junior Degree Class and the Junior Xormal Class. In the event that the Edrtor-in- 
Chief is elected from the Junior Degree Class, the Business Manager must he elected 
from the Junior Xormal Class. If the Business Manager is elected from the Junior 
Degree Class, the Editor-in-Chief must he elected from the Junior Normal Class. 

ARTICLE II. 

Selection of the Staff. 

Editor-in-( hief shall appoint his own assistant and all necessary 



Section 1: 


— Th 


associates. 




Section 2 


— Th 



Business Manager shall appoint his own assistants. 

Amendment 1. 

In the event that the Junior Degree Class is without an organization in the matter 
of officers, the duties of the president of that Class shall be performed by the president 

Of the ( 'ollege Section. 



Our Ihouhf-il Thirty-seven 







I 






One Hundred Thirty-eight 







24. 



One Ihimlreil Thirty-nine 



Johnny: "What's a back-sea 40 " 
Betty: 'Til bite, what is it?" 
Johnny : "A thing to fight for in 
either a class room or an automo- 
bile." 



Prof. : "Who started the loose- 
leaf system?" 
Stude: "Eve." 



Stewed: "Shay mishter, wher ish 
Main street?" 

The Police-force : "You are 
standing on it." 

Stewed: "No wonder I couldn't 
find it." 



An Old Tin Type. 

Squire: "Did you send for me. 
my lord?" 

Launcelot: "Yes, make haste. 
Bring the can opener; I've a flea in 
my knight clothes." 



Him : "If I get married I'll have 
to work night and day." 
Her: "Why so?" 
Him : "I'm a floor walker." 



Nip: "I fell last night and struck 

my head on the piano." 
Tuck: "Hurt yourself?" 
Nip : "No, luckily I fell on a soft 

pedal." — Punch Bowl. 



"You certainly are crazy about 
women." 

"Why shouldn't I be? Half of my 
parents were women." 



Johnny : "She asked me to kiss 
her on either cheek." 

Ryan : "Which one did you kiss 
her on?" 

Johnny : "Well, I hesitated a long 
time between them." 



Tish : "Johnny was all lit up last 
night." 

Dile : "Yes, all the lightning bugs 
went home thinking it was day- 
light." 

Fortune teller: "May I tell you 
something of your fortune?" 

Steiener: "Tell it to rush." 



Dumb : " Say there ! Don't spit 
on the floor." 

Bell: "SS matter. Floor leak?" 



Mr. Manchester : "Why did you 
tip that boy so handsomely when lu 
gave you your coat?" 

Mr. Stopher : "Look at the coat 
lie save me." 



Male Stater: "Are you sure the 
fellows up at the house know I'm 
going up to dinner with you?" 

K. M. K. : "They ought to; I 
argued with them for an hour about 
it." 

"For goodness sake, John, what 
happened to you in the football 
game? You've lost your front 
teeth." 

"No, I haven't. Here they are in 
my pocket." 



Jinny : "What is the difference 
between a flea and an elephant?" 

Flo. : / "Difference between a flea 
and an elephant ? I don't know, what 
is it?" 

Jinny : "Why, an elephant can 
have fleas, but a flea can't have 
elephants." 



Kelley : "When our president 
died, who got the job?" 

Mim : "Why, the vice-president, 
of course, stupid." 

Kelley : "Nope, the undertaker." 



Our Hundred Forty 



Jftnanctal Statement 

In order to clear ourselves of any suspicions that may arise regarding 
the disposition of Chestnut Burr funds, we submit the following financial 
report : 

Receipts. 

Advertising $ 322.17 

Sale of books 500.23 

From organizations (for privilege of having pictures run) 300.00 

From interested friends 152.74 

From plays 36.40 

Total $1,311.54 

Expenditures. 

Salaries of the staff $ 1.75 

Expert collector (for 21 days' service in attempting to separate 

students and faculty from photographs) 567.13 

Photographer 75.67 

Engraver 1 2.33 

Printer 114.1') 

Trips to Canton 427.08 

Entertainment while there 330.52 

Trips to Pittsburgh 95.40 

Entertainment while there 240.64 

Refreshment for staff and friends 523.98 

Shoulder-braces for the editors 15.00 

Total $2,412.69 

The deficit of $1,101.15 was made up by the editors and business man- 
ager. 

Respectful!}' submitted. 

M. B. LISTER, Bus. Mgr. 



One Hundred Furly-une 



"Whenever you think of Stationery, 
think of Siviter's" 




Thomas Siviter & Co. 

Distinctive Printers and Engravers 



Party Favors 

Gifts 

Bridge Novelties 

Blank and Loose-Leaf Books 

Social and Commercial Stationery 

Greeting Cards for All Occasions 

n ii 

Printers of High School and College Annuals 
Catalogues and Directories 

Printers of the "Chestnut-Burr" 
n ii 

119 SHADY AVENUE 

PITTSBURGH 

"Next to the East Liberty Postoffice" 

MOntrose 0358 MOntrose 0359 



One Hundred Forty-two 



KENT STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 

A Growing Teachers College 

An Editorial from the April (1924) Issue of the Normal 
Instructor and Primary Plans 



The Kent State Teachers College, located in northeast 
< )hio, has made remarkable progress during the past ten years. 
Official publications indicate that the enrollment has increased 
more than 900 per cent in the last decade. The college was 
established in 1912 and was one of the first in Ohio to carry on 
extension work in professional subjects throughout northeast 
Ohio. J. E. McGilvrey instituted extension work when he be- 
came president of Kent State College. He also worked out with 
his assistants a very splendid home study department, which 
gives service to students who have been in residence and who 
have made good records. Kent College stands for progress. It 
graduates more than 350 per year. It has a four-year course 
leading to degree of B. S. in Education well established. Among 
the many other advantages the college has a splendid rural de- 
partment, and the teachers have opportunity to observe and 
practice in sixteen consolidated rural schools in the county in 
which the college is located. The institution has also in- 
augurated a great idea in travel in connection with the summer 
quarter term. Students can register, go to the N. E. A., see the 
city iif Washington and other eastern cities, travel through New 
England, return to Kent and take up the regular summer quarter 
work. 

There were 3,740 students in attendance at the school last 
summer. Summer catalogs are now being issued and can be 
secured by addressing tile Summer College Director, Kent State 
College, Kent, i >hio. 



(i>ir llmuhitl Fotty-thret 



GENSEMER BROS. 



KENT, OHIO 



WADSWORTH 

CRESTON 

CANTON 



Retailers of 



DRY GOODS : : : 
FLOOR COVERINGS 

LADIES' AND CHILDREN'S FOOTWEAR 
LADIES' READY MADE GARMENTS 



Kent Opera House 

High Class 

ENTERTAINMENT 

MOVING PICTURES 

VAUDEVILLE 



JOHN PALFI 

Manager and Owner 

Telephone 159 P. O. Box 27 

KENT, OHIO 



The 
Kent Restaurant 

156 NORTH WATER ST. 
COME IN. AND SEE US 

You Will Come Again 



Shriver & Webster 



Proprietors 



One Hundred Forty-jour 






The Book Store 

STUDENT'S HEADQUARTERS 



for 



College Supplies 

Come in 
QUALITY — SERVICE — LOW PRICES 

Established in 1912 
"Make our store your store when down town." 

E. R. STEINER 

NEW LOCATION— 141 EAST MAIN STREET 
Directly across frcm Courier Office. 



The watchman in a cemetery 
came across a tramp lying in the 
grass. He kicked the tramp, who 
awoke with an injured air. 

"What are you doing?" shouted 
the watch-dog of the dead. 

"Playing dead." answered the 
sleepy traveler. "When in Rome 
I do as the Romans do." 



H. C. Longcoy 

"GOOD THINGS TO EAT" 

FOR YOUR "SPREADS" 

We suggest Longcoy's Home Cooked 
Cold Meats, College Inn Products 
in tins. Sandwich Fillings, Olives, 
Jams, Fancy Cakes, Fruits, Etc. 

124 S. WATER ST. 



Ladies' Hosiery 

HOLE PROOF and CINDERELLA 

See the latest shades for 
Spring and Summer. 

BOBOLINK— ROSE BEIGE 

JACK RABBIT— ANTIQUE 

AIREDALE— PEACH 

French Lace Clox 
Diamond Point Heel 

TRUNKS - BAGS - SUITCASES 

Coe Livingston 

"Advertiser of Facts Only" 
KENT, OHIO 



One Hundred Forty-five 



Compliments of 

Imperial Dry 
Cleaning Co. 

Phone 452 

113 N- WATER ST. 
KENT, OHIO 



J. A. Giggers 

GENERAL HARDWARE 

Stoves and Building Material 

Lowe Brothers Paints and 
Varnishes 



Service - Efficiency - Courtesy 

S. C. Bissler & Son 

Complete Home Furnishers 

Funeral Directors 

112-114 E. MAIN STREET 

KENT, OHIO 

Phone 530 



Gibson and Ott 
Restaurant 



Cor. MAIN AND FRANKLIN 



Phone 124 



KENT, OHIO 



A man bought a suit from a 
Jewish clothier for ten dollars. 
When he opened the suit at home 
he discovered it was alive with 
moths. He took the suit back to 
the Jew and said : 

"I can't take this suit — it's full 
of moths," to which the Jew re- 
plied: "Veil, vat do you vant for 
ten dollars? Mocking birds?" 



Howard Young 

143 E. Main St. Kent, Ohio 

BICYCLES, SPORTING GOODS 

FISHING TACKLE 

AUTO ACCESSORIES 

'N Everything 



One Hundred Fortv-six 



NO 
NOBLER 
SERVICE 




THAN 

TEACHING 

THE YOUNG 



Teach them the habit of saving their money 

And do not forget to save part of your earnings 

The most important part of your salary is the part you save 

Save for the Sunshiny Day as well as the Rainy Day 

Save for a vacation and other delightful objects 

Save for the serious events of life 

Always save with a smile 

You are cordially invited to make use of this modern bank 

Checking" accounts — Saving's accounts — Safe Deposit Boxes 

THE KENT NATIONAL BANK 

"The Friendly Bank on the Corner" 






Kent, Ohio 

Hart, Sckaffner & Marx Clothing 

WALK-OVER SHOES 

for 
Men and Women 

Everwear and Van Ralte Hose 
Tennis Shoes end Oxfords 





Kent, Ohio 




A TREAT TO EAT 
TRORY'S 

Famous Ice Cream 

Jacobs Drug Store 

"The Kodak Stor'a" 

MAIN STREET 

KENT, OHIO 



One Hundred Forty-seven 




Davey Tree Surgeons 

for 
SAFE TREE SURGEKiT 

Avail yourself of our free inspection 
ccrvice. We are equipped to render 
prompt service. Trimming, pruning, 
fertilizing, spraying, Tree Surgery. 

The Davey Tree Expert Co. Inc. 

KENT, OHIO 




The Gruen Prestige costs no more. 
The name on the watch dial is all 
important — GRUEN. 

G. F. ELGIN 

Jeweler and Optometrist 
114 N. WATER ST. 



Sunday 


School teacher : 


"The 


whale got 


his prophet out 


of the 


water." 






Mickey : 


"So does our 


milk- 


man." — Gargoyle. 




"De man in room sebe 


n has 


done hung 


hisself!" 




"Hanged himself? Did y 


ou cut 


him down 


1,5 




"No sah 


! He ain't dead 


vet." 



KENT ELECTRIC 

139 S. WATER 



If Electrical we have it. 

Consult us on all your Electrical 
needs. 



C. J. SMITH E. C. BURKHARDT 
Phone 587 



FISHER & KEMP 

113 South Water Street 
Phone 670 

DEALERS IN FRESH AND 
SMOKED MEATS 



One Hundred Forty-eight 



MEET YOUR FRIENDS 



at 



Thompson's Drug Store 



(Main and Water Streets) 



WHERE THE STUDENTS PURCHASE THEIR 



ART SUPPLIES 

NOTE BOOKS 

AUTOMATIC PENCILS 

FOUNTAIN PENS 

CANDY 



TOILET ARTICLES 
TEXT BOOKS 
STATIONERY 

ATHLETIC GOODS 
ICE CREAM 



'EVERYTHING YOU WOULD EXPECT IN A MODERN 
DRUG STORE" 



Hale B. Thompson 

Pharmacist 



;#3 



One llumlrt-tl Forty-nine 



Olin's Quality Music Store 



The New Edison 

Pianos 

Players 

Grand Pianos 

Musical 
Instruments 




Latest Hits 

Edison Records 

Gennett Records 

Sheet Music 

Player 

Rolls 



F. BURNS 

BARBER SHOP 



150 North Water Street 
Kent, Ohio 



Richelieu Food Products 
denote quality 



FOR SALE BY 

Kneifel Grocery Co. 

N. Water Street 



ROLLINS 

ARMOR PLATE HOSIERY 

"Miles of wear in every pair" 

W. R. Zingler Co. 

Store of Economy 

DRY GOODS, NOTIONS 

GFNERAL MERCHANDISE AND 

LADIES FURNISHINGS 

KENT, OHIO 



House Wiring - Electrical Appliances 
Motors Installed and Repaired 

EARL F. FRANCIS 

ELECTRICIAN 

Phone 497 

143 NORTH WATER STREET 

KENT, OHIO 



One Hundred Fifty 






W. H. Donaghy Drug Co. 

"THE FRIENDLY DRUG STORE" 



Devoted to the interests of the students of 
Kent State College 



Standard Electric Co. 



n 




u 



TMEHAHD^ 

ABJUST5* 

THE LAMP OR SHAD* TO AJIY P03TTU* 

Opposite the Post Office 



Pat: ' You know more than I 
do." 

Jack : "< )f course." 

Pat: "Vnii knciw me, and I 
know yon." 



FOR GOOD WORK 
Go to 

Cleveland Shoe Repairing Co. 

140 EAST MAIN ST. 



READ STUDIO 



HIGH CLASS PORTRAITS 



AMATEUR FINISHING 



All Classes of Commercial 
Photography 



129 EAST MAIN STREET 
KENT, OHIO 



Phone 226 



One Hundred Fifty-oil 



The City Bank 

KENT, OHIO 

Organized 1881 

Assets Over $1,000,000 

SAFETY DEPOSIT BOXES FOR RENT 



«£ 



4 Per Cent on Time Deposits 



<£ 



OFFICERS: 

H. H. LINE ------ Chairman of Board 

M. G. GARRISON ------- President 

D. L. ROCKWELL ----- Vice-President 

E. F. GARRISON ----- Secretary-Treasurer 
G. F. BECHTLE - Assistant Treasurer 



One Hundred Fifty-two 



^lutograpijs! 






One llunilrril Fifty-three 



&utograpf)£ 



One Hundred Fifty-four 






&utDgrapf)£ 



r,A 



24 



l\yT~/^ Z^^ 3 * One Hundred Fifty-fit 



&utograpf)£ 



One Hundred Fifty-six 



-^i